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Bi-Polar...anyone Here Who Could Share Advice


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Hello

I'm Bi-Polar II and was diagnosed when I was 29. I was just wondering if anyone here has the same disorder and could share some advice.

Best

MVT

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HYPNOTIC.

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When did you realize you might have something that others didn't? How did you parent's respond? How was the med merry-go-round till you found the right cocktail?

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1. When I thought it was a good idea to run through the snow with my swim shorts and sandals. Or when I spent thousands of pounds on crap I couldn't take back. When I got so paranoid I locked myself in my house for 6 weeks. When I thought my wife was a doctor trying to lock me up.

2. Very shocked...then denial...then supportive.

3. Awful. It took 6 months to find the right combination. Anyway, way before this the mania had gone and the depression; racing thoughts; anxiety and agitation had set in so it was a pretty long time. The combo is still being changed up and down 3 years later.

Best

MVT

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  • 2 weeks later...
The Shattered Soldier

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I've been diagnosed bipolar disorder since 1996 (16 years) I hear ya on the running thing. Once I wore a pair of tattered pajamas with a beaten up tight under suit to my brother's high school. I actually conned than to make me stay at the school all day to see teachers, talk to old friends, just fuck around and create total chaos. I'm embarrassed when I look back on it, but man, I make a lot of people with my energy. The only person who didn't want my there was my brother.

I've never had anyone every change roles on me so I don't know what that's like. Identities are pretty solid for me, even when I make them up. For example, if you look like Alec Balwdwin, that's who you are to me. There's no way out of it. And this is when I'm totally sane. You're the President of KableTown, your assistance's Liz Lemon, and you thing Words With Friends Rocks just like me!

Now, its obvious that we have some drug problems since we are posting on the this. I just came across a WONDERFUL med that feels like the missing piece, you never know with that bastard time :( . So lets trade so stories about our mania/depression and maybe we can become powerful allies in making our lives....a little more liveable.

Mike

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  • 5 months later...
Guest memfaith

I've come acrossed being bipoloar. Thinking and doing. In my mind I would think how good today would be. How amazing it would be to take my wife out to have a nice time on a day off. I would plan and plan but when we actually go out. The worst that I've had imagined in my head will happen in front of my face. That's my experience then I try to fight it. Be strong. Stay Strong. Whatever negative thoughts come into mind. Fight it off. Whatever don't belong there. Remove. it. Build a clean mind.

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Hello

I'm Bi-Polar II and was diagnosed when I was 29. I was just wondering if anyone here has the same disorder and could share some advice.

Best

MVT

We have the same disorder! tips? take your meds... ;) Finding the right combo is challenging...I'm going to be doing the same dance myself soon. I went through similar experiences before I was diagnosed, people think you're crazy but, your brain is just not firing correctly... can you feel manic episodes coming on? Do you like the manic episodes? I'm just curious...I guess I need to find a bi-polar II forum too... best of luck with things.
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  • 3 weeks later...

i have been bi-polar for over 20 years.you have your goods and bads like other members.i have been on so many meds i can't even remember.zoloft and seoquel for my ptsd work half way decent,but i find myself fighting the feelings i have to do stupid things.all you can do is the best you can.i don't think there will be a 100% cure.that is why a lot of us self medicate to deal with things.just hang in there and do your best.

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  • 3 months later...
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Sometimes, the best thing you can do is just to have a stable routine to work through things. I love sleep. Treasure it. But I force myself to go to bed and get up at the same time everyday, even on weekends, so my body is used to it. That way, when I lay down, my body knows it's time for bed. Same with meds, meals, exercise, and social interaction. I try to plan out my days, so I don't suddenly find myself at 10pm, still in my PJs from the night before, unsure where my entire day went. A routine has been really useful for me.

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The Shattered Soldier

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Sometimes, the best thing you can do is just to have a stable routine to work through things. I love sleep. Treasure it. But I force myself to go to bed and get up at the same time everyday, even on weekends, so my body is used to it. That way, when I lay down, my body knows it's time for bed. Same with meds, meals, exercise, and social interaction. I try to plan out my days, so I don't suddenly find myself at 10pm, still in my PJs from the night before, unsure where my entire day went. A routine has been really useful for me.

 

Not having a stable routine has been total chaos for me.  I can't really discern up from down or night and day.  Since I began working nights I haven't been able to get on a normal sleep schedule.  Lights out could be 11am, 3pm, 3am, or just whenever I decide to pop a Seroquel (if I choose to do so).  We all have a sleep gate, and lately mine tends to open around 3pm which is very inconvenient on the weekends or if I have to see my pdoc at 2:30pm sometime during the week.  I think it's destabilized me to some point and sometimes I feel like I can barely think straight.  I would love to have a classic M-F job from 9-5, enjoy my online refreshments before or after dinner, and pop my "lights out pill" at around 10, and be dead to the world somewhere around 11pm, but I have no such luxury.

 

I looked back at my last post where I had just discovered Ritalin and saw all of the spelling and grammatical errors.  Ugh, I'm glad I kicked that expensive habit, it just made things even worse.  There was actually one period of time where I spent an entire 48 hours reading and responding to posts on the forum (and people wonder how the hell I got my post count so high!).  Another great cause of lack of sleep and instability can be the "forum addiction syndrome" as well.  This leads me to believe that bipolar people really need to keep an eye on their addictive substances and activities more closely than most people.  Our brains are already pushed so far up, down, left, or right that adding something extra to the fray needs to be closely monitored or the results could be disastrous.

 

Anyone agree? 

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Definitely agree! Hypomania for me leaves me feeling energized and invincible at times, but I never seem to use that energy in contructive ways. Instead, it leads me out to bars and clubs and staying out all night/day at other people's houses and surfing/shopping on the internet until I geat a headache from staring at the computer screen. It's really easy to fall into some negative patterns, and just about anything can become an addiction when you are stuck in the mindset that "A little is nice, so a lot would be great, and everything could be fantastic!" Moderation is definitely key. You got to be aware of healthy limits for yourself, and it also helps to share those limits with the people you trust/care about, so they can help keep you accountable. My family are ususally the first people to notice when I'm switching from a down swing into an up swing, and they can help me recognize it, when I just think I'm feeling great and full of energy!

 

Man, third shift is a bitch on anyone, but especially when your living with mental health issues. It's hard to plan your life around those hours, especially when it comes to appointment and social interaction. Any chance of switching shifts, or are you pretty much stuck? My friend actually was able to get a note from his doctor stating that the third shift was unhealthy for him with his Depression, and he had to be swifted to a first/second shift instead.

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The Shattered Soldier

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Definitely agree! Hypomania for me leaves me feeling energized and invincible at times, but I never seem to use that energy in contructive ways. Instead, it leads me out to bars and clubs and staying out all night/day at other people's houses and surfing/shopping on the internet until I geat a headache from staring at the computer screen. It's really easy to fall into some negative patterns, and just about anything can become an addiction when you are stuck in the mindset that "A little is nice, so a lot would be great, and everything could be fantastic!" Moderation is definitely key. You got to be aware of healthy limits for yourself, and it also helps to share those limits with the people you trust/care about, so they can help keep you accountable. My family are ususally the first people to notice when I'm switching from a down swing into an up swing, and they can help me recognize it, when I just think I'm feeling great and full of energy!

 

Man, third shift is a bitch on anyone, but especially when your living with mental health issues. It's hard to plan your life around those hours, especially when it comes to appointment and social interaction. Any chance of switching shifts, or are you pretty much stuck? My friend actually was able to get a note from his doctor stating that the third shift was unhealthy for him with his Depression, and he had to be swifted to a first/second shift instead.

 

I fought hard to get this shift as a transfer from the vicious hell hole I was at before so yes, I'm pretty much stuck here for now until another full time position opens up for my location.  This company could care less if I live or die, let alone if I'm having a few mental health issues.  It's a very cold, uncaring, and unprofessional organization.  They would absolutely scoff at a doctor's note from me. 

 

I'm on the downswing right now so I haven't really been doing too much online shopping or binging on drugs and alcohol.  Even the little things in life are kind of overwhelming my mind right now.  I've noticed that I get less and less sharp as my mood drops out.  I just go into a mode where I try to hold my shit together until my mood improves.  It's just crazy because there really isn't that much that is wrong in my life right now, and there's plenty of fun to be had. 

 

I kind of worry because I went off of my MAOI about two months ago and am wondering if I may need it again.  It was actually my last resort medication class with ECT looming over me as my final option.  The depressions just get that bad.  My friends and family don't know what the hell to do with me so I always have to be prepared to take matters into my own hands.  I usually just tell myself that I'll be better by the next full moon and take inventory of all the positive things I have in the meantime.  If things don't work out by the full moon then I'll just have to talk to my doctor about getting back on my Parnate and hope that it's not just buying me yet another ticket on the med-go-round.  On the bright side, I've been going through this bs for a good half of my life now and am kind of used to handling the so called ups and downs of bipolar disorder.

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Your job sounds terrible. I hope some good opportunities open up for you soon. Sounds like you’re doing all the right things, focusing on the positives and trying to push forward through the downslide. That’s probably the worst thing about this disorder – you do all the right things and it still beats you down. Definitely a rough life and it doesn’t so much get easier, but at least it gets a little more expected or familiar.


 

I Hate the med-maze. I’ve been on a pretty stable regimen for the last year and half, but the side effects drive me nuts, especially the weight gain, the sedation, and the foggy-brain. I’m lucky to have a pretty great psychiatrist and therapist team though, who are equal parts good listeners and excellent bullshit spotters. I’m an advocate for talking to your doctor sooner rather than later. If you’re going to go through the med-merry-go-round, might as well start early. ECT always sounds like a scary option, especially with side effects like memory loss, but I’ve seen it do some pretty powerful work in some of my friends too. If it does come down to that, it might have a really great outcome for you.



 

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Chewbacca1892

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My step daughter got diagnosed with bi polar at 16. She had a couple of episodes when she was younger but for the last 4 years or do she's been fine and seems to be able to control it without having to take her meds. I'm not sure whether she still self harms as that was what she used to do when she was ill with it

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The Shattered Soldier

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My step daughter got diagnosed with bi polar at 16. She had a couple of episodes when she was younger but for the last 4 years or do she's been fine and seems to be able to control it without having to take her meds. I'm not sure whether she still self harms as that was what she used to do when she was ill with it

This is interesting as the disorder is commonly known as a permanent and ongoing set of symptoms, behavior patterns, and mood changes that can not be cured.  With that said, it must be taken into account that many doctors and psychiatrists are more than eager to slap a label on anything that they can not explain.  What could be teenage angst or just your everyday maladaptive behaviors could easily slip by a clinician and present itself as mania or depression when indeed it is just hormonal problems, external strife, attention seeking behavior, or any number of inappropriate reactions to life's problems.  I once had some green stick doc try to tell me that I may have OCD because of my barrage of somatic complaints.  He was totally out of his league in labeling me with something so utterly ludicrous, and I quickly found a more educated professional to help me manage my disorder.  I soon discovered that my somatic complaints were just a result of the depressive phase I was going through.  Anyway, my point being, if it were truly bipolar disorder, it wouldn't just resolve on it's own. 

 

My other point is quite clear, just because a clinician labels you with something doesn't necessarily mean that they are right.  Read up on it and you'll see that once you have it, it's your friend for life.  However, I'm glad that your step daughter is doing well without having to be on the bipolar med-go-round.  For me, finding the right medication only to have it stop working after a period of time is the most frustrating aspect of having this disorder.

 

I do believe that there are a select few that can manage the ups and downs of the disorder, but it is very uncommon and is an extremely difficult task if you are truly bipolar.  I've dropped my meds on multiple occasions only to come crawling back to them beaten, battered, and hopeless.  In regards to your step daughter's condition, I don't know if I'm motivated to share all of this information due to skepticism or just sheer jealousy that somebody can weather the storms without a consistent, effective, and buoyant medication life raft.

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  • 11 months later...

I was told I had Bipolar from a doctor and he gave me seroquil 300 mg. I found out later that I did not have bipolar, it was my thyroid. Doctors just take the easy way out and don't do tests on you. Most doctors don't think about your thyroid functions on how you feel. Pretty sad.

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