Jump to content
You are a guest user Click to join the site
  • Sign Up

Welcome Guest

Welcome to drugbuyersguide, like most online communities you must register to view or post in our community, but don't worry this is a simple free process that requires minimal information for you to signup. Be apart of Drug Buyers Guide Forum by signing in or creating an account.

  • Start new topics and reply to others
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get email updates
  • Get your own profile page and make new friends
  • Send personal messages to other members.

My personal experience and review of 0xycod0ne.


VII

Recommended Posts

  • Members

  • Group:  Members
  • Topic Count:  0
  • Content Count:  288
  • Reputation:   135
  • Joined:  04/16/2016
  • Status:  Offline
  • Last Seen:  

Before there's any controversy about this thread it was created to share my personal experience being on the medication for educational purposes only.

Experience and story: My doctor gave me 30mg of 0xyc0d0ne for pain. This was a one-time thing seeing I was going through heavy pain at the time. I took the dose around 8PM at night seeing I read up about it having sedative properties and I wasn't sure what to expect so I had the mindset "better safe than sorry" before consuming it. I wasn't sure if it was going to knock me out or what would happen but my doctor made it clear that I would be alright either way and I shouldn't worry that much.

I have a serious panic disorder so I'm prescribed benzos - from what I was told benzos enhance 0xyc0d0ne's effects but seeing I didn't have a tolerance to it I wasn't sure what to expect at all, so here comes the experience seeing I thought I'd give the backstory to it. As a note, this was a one time thing. It's not like my doctor is going to prescribe me this ever again unless it's absolutely necessary. 

When I took the medication I felt nothing for the first thirty minutes then it started to kick in. I had various pain all over my body at the time and the pain started to slowly ween itself down which was good. 45-60 minutes into the dosage near all my pain areas felt relaxed with a pleasant "tingly" sensation instead of pain. There was an euphoric feeling indeed, but most importantly there was more of a drowsiness effect where I found myself sometimes closing my eyes and having trouble opening them up so I simply splashed my face with some water and it seemed to resolve that issue for a period of time before I had to do it again.

For some strange reason I had a very hard time urinating, I assume it was due to the medication having a strong effect assistance with muscle relaxing which caused that but it wasn't too much of a concern. My senses overall were I assume above average, I loved feeling soft things, listening to soft music, and I can't really say much about smell besides air freshener was noticeably stronger than before (enhanced due to the medication). I also had cottonmouth as a side effect, but once again nothing serious.

As time was going by, I noticed I had a hard time making out my sentences at times along with walking after laying down or sitting in my desk chair for a period of time. Perhaps that's due to the sedative properties that come along with it. Regarding the euphoric feeling, everything around me felt better than normal and I wasn't obtaining any panic what-so-ever which is a huge plus. I thought I'd give it a few more hours before going to sleep to provide a more accurate review so that's what I did.

I was diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome at a young age, with that said I did indeed experience a quite strange effect which all my APS (Asperger's Syndrome) symptoms were absolutely gone as if I never had them. I did not imagine this, I was fully aware of what was going on around me and I knew I wasn't crazy. In my whole entire life I've never seen the world the way that others saw it, during this experience I can now say I know what it's like to see the world as a human being without seeing things from a different perspective involved with APS. I've never had my APS issues just vanish like that before, not once in my life. Even after the dose started to wear off I'm not experiencing my ASP symptoms which is roughly 7-8 or so hours after the dose.   

I did feel my pain levels increase slowly after the dose was wearing off, but that was to be expected. I didn't expect to never have pain again, but it's honestly not as bad as it was before which is important. 

My personal rating and conclusion: I'd give this particular medication a 7/10.

Pros: 

-Very good pain relief.

-Helped with fibromyalgia discomfort and pain. 

-Not having signs of Autism, specifically Asperger's Syndrome while under the effects of this medication.

Cons:

-It's strong, I wouldn't be able to drive a vehicle.

-Trouble urinating.

-Cottonmouth (expected).

-Heavy drowsiness which could be caused due to my medication that was previously in my system to treat my panic disorder yet enhanced.

------------

Overall, it did the job to fight my pain. I think my doctor gave me too much regarding dosage even if my pain was bad, I think it was too high of a dose. 

I hope you guys found this helpful. In no way shape or form was this abusing the drug, it was used to fight pain that was obtained from a doctor. I decided to share my experience to the community due to the fact some may of never been on this medication and wouldn't know what to expect, this will give you a generalized idea on what to expect from my own experience fighting this particular pain if you were ever to be prescribed this medication for any reason. Every individual has different reactions to medications so your experience may or will vary compared to my own.

However does anyone else find it strange that I didn't feel any of my average ASP symptoms while on this medication? It was so bizarre, I've never felt that way in my life where I didn't have the negative effects of APS especially with being anti-social, I found myself more comfortable talking to others which is strange because I never had that feeling in my life. I've always been anti-social to an extent due to either APS or my anxiety disorder. I can't tell which one causes it but whatever it was it seemed to resolve my APS issues I've struggled with my whole entire life. So I wonder if something like this could be somewhat of a cure of some sort that they can take notes from to design a medication to assist people with APS.

I hope my experience will be useful to those that are curious about the medication and/or their doctor wanted to prescribe the medication to these users. I'd say it isn't as bad as it sounds, if you suffer from pain it really does the job. If your doctor does prescribe it though and you don't have a tolerance to it, try to request a very low dose due to the fact I found it hard to function at certain times and you wouldn't be able to drive for sure.

Hope this helped,

-VII

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

  • Group:  Members
  • Topic Count:  0
  • Content Count:  263
  • Reputation:   156
  • Joined:  12/07/2015
  • Status:  Offline
  • Last Seen:  

It's interesting, there is a theory that the increase in autism spectrum disorders is connected to increased use of opioids. And also that people on opioids relate to others in a autistic fashion. (I realize Aspbergers isn't autism, but they're talking about symptoms not diagnoses.) There's an article here reviewing the theory & the evidence for it, if you want to read it: http://www.discoverymedicine.com/Brian-Johnson-2/2014/10/fibromyalgia-autism-and-opioid-addiction-as-natural-and-induced-disorders-of-the-endogenous-opioid-hormonal-system/

If you want the short version

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Because of their circulation through the blood, the multiplicity of receptor sites, and the diversity of functions, opioids may most accurately be designated as a hormone. Opioidsmodulate the intensity of pain. In mammals, the opioid system has been modified to modulate social interactions as well (Panksepp and Watt, 2011).

METHODS:

Over 10,000 patient encounters were observed on a neuropsychoanalytic addiction medicine service. Cold pressor times (CPT) were recorded before and after stimulation of theopioid system with low-dose naltrexone (LDN) for patients after opioid detoxification and for fibromyalgia patients.

RESULTS:

Patients maintained on opioids relate autistically. The cold, unrelated nature of their human interactions was reversed by detoxification from opioids. Fibromyalgia patients have difficulty participating in human relationships, as if they lack an ability to respond interpersonally, as do post-detoxification patients. LDN improved pain tolerance as shown by a significant increase on CPT for post detoxification patients from 16 seconds to 55 seconds and in fibromyalgia patients from 21 seconds to 42 seconds, and improved relatedness. The correlation of opioid prescribing increasing over time and autism prevalence increasing over time is highly significant.

CONCLUSIONS:

1. Opioid-maintained patients relate autistically. 2. Autism is a hyperopioidergicdisorder. 3. Fibromylagia is a hypoopioidergic disorder. 4. Low opioid tone caused by opioidmaintenance or fibromyalgia can usually be reversed with low-dose naltrexone. 5. The increase in the incidence of autism may have been caused by the increase in use of opioids for analgesia during childbirth.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

  • Group:  Members
  • Topic Count:  0
  • Content Count:  288
  • Reputation:   135
  • Joined:  04/16/2016
  • Status:  Offline
  • Last Seen:  

1 hour ago, Biteme said:

It's interesting, there is a theory that the increase in autism spectrum disorders is connected to increased use of opioids. And also that people on opioids relate to others in a autistic fashion. (I realize Aspbergers isn't autism, but they're talking about symptoms not diagnoses.) There's an article here reviewing the theory & the evidence for it, if you want to read it: http://www.discoverymedicine.com/Brian-Johnson-2/2014/10/fibromyalgia-autism-and-opioid-addiction-as-natural-and-induced-disorders-of-the-endogenous-opioid-hormonal-system/

If you want the short version

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Because of their circulation through the blood, the multiplicity of receptor sites, and the diversity of functions, opioids may most accurately be designated as a hormone. Opioidsmodulate the intensity of pain. In mammals, the opioid system has been modified to modulate social interactions as well (Panksepp and Watt, 2011).

METHODS:

Over 10,000 patient encounters were observed on a neuropsychoanalytic addiction medicine service. Cold pressor times (CPT) were recorded before and after stimulation of theopioid system with low-dose naltrexone (LDN) for patients after opioid detoxification and for fibromyalgia patients.

RESULTS:

Patients maintained on opioids relate autistically. The cold, unrelated nature of their human interactions was reversed by detoxification from opioids. Fibromyalgia patients have difficulty participating in human relationships, as if they lack an ability to respond interpersonally, as do post-detoxification patients. LDN improved pain tolerance as shown by a significant increase on CPT for post detoxification patients from 16 seconds to 55 seconds and in fibromyalgia patients from 21 seconds to 42 seconds, and improved relatedness. The correlation of opioid prescribing increasing over time and autism prevalence increasing over time is highly significant.

CONCLUSIONS:

1. Opioid-maintained patients relate autistically. 2. Autism is a hyperopioidergicdisorder. 3. Fibromylagia is a hypoopioidergic disorder. 4. Low opioid tone caused by opioidmaintenance or fibromyalgia can usually be reversed with low-dose naltrexone. 5. The increase in the incidence of autism may have been caused by the increase in use of opioids for analgesia during childbirth.

My good lord, that's so strange. It seems the contents of the drug can help people with autism-- yes Asperger's Syndrome is a form of autism. The problem with the assistance it has to offer is mostly artificial.

For instance, I was unable to actually feel happy. I knew when I was happy, but I never felt it. On this drug and similar ones I actually could feel the sense of hapiness flow through me when I got in a happy mood rather it's laughing at a joke or seeing a family member, it was all new to me as if it opened up a new world. I was also thinking much differently but much clearer at the time. I guess you could say I was thinking as logical as I possibly could. 

It turns out most of these are artificial feelings that are caused by the drugs substances. It does not help in the long run, only for the period of time that it's in your system which is why I'd advise people to stay away from it if they're trying to solve other issues besides pain with any form of opi substance. Not only due to the addiction rates, but it could cause serious health problems that can result in death if you are not careful (just from what I've read).

So all in all, even tough it helped for a short period of time to know what it feels like to be a "normal" human being rather it's artificial or not it was a good experience but I will refuse to take it for that cause. Only for serious pain issues, nothing more that's what it's designed for afterall. 

I'm glad you posted about this, I'll also look more into this to see if it has any real effect to assist people with autism. If there are specific properties that were not artificial I'd like to find out because having those drugs open for autistic patients to assist with their issues will open a new world for them with a non-narcotic drug substance to assist living a normal every day life without feeling different due to the negative attributes that come along with it.

Thank you so much,

-VII

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

  • Group:  Members
  • Topic Count:  0
  • Content Count:  263
  • Reputation:   156
  • Joined:  12/07/2015
  • Status:  Offline
  • Last Seen:  

Except the article is saying that opioid use produce autistic-like symptoms in people (e.g., people on opioids feel or act distantly from others). They suggest people with autism may have problems with opioid receptors that cause their symptoms, but the problem is too much activation of the opioid receptors. This is the opposite of your experience. They recommend naltrexone (which reduces the effects of opioids) for autism. I'm not saying they're right, but that maybe opioid receptors are involved in autism in a more complicated way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

  • Group:  Members
  • Topic Count:  0
  • Content Count:  288
  • Reputation:   135
  • Joined:  04/16/2016
  • Status:  Offline
  • Last Seen:  

9 hours ago, Biteme said:

Except the article is saying that opioid use produce autistic-like symptoms in people (e.g., people on opioids feel or act distantly from others). They suggest people with autism may have problems with opioid receptors that cause their symptoms, but the problem is too much activation of the opioid receptors. This is the opposite of your experience. They recommend naltrexone (which reduces the effects of opioids) for autism. I'm not saying they're right, but that maybe opioid receptors are involved in autism in a more complicated way.

Very interesting...so I must have an opposite reaction to that particular substance in oxy if that's the case. However, I'll look into Naltrexone for a few reasons, one due to the fact I'm looking to lower my dosage of benzos and two the effects are quite interesting to explore and discuss I must say.

Have you seen any direct research about autism and opi's regarding specific tests that were conducted? It might be difficult seeing such a thing would be finding a needle in a haystack.

What I did find out is people with autism have increased autistic effects while on opiates. However, people that suffer from autism or aspergers tend to look at the drug as relief from specific aspects of what they experience that others do not. A prime example is social and stress issues, by default there's no doubt people that suffer from these disorders have social issues along with increased stress due to confusion and seeing things differently than others. With that said, while on opiates they felt relieved from the negative aspects of social and stress issues they have on a daily basis. It doesn't mean they're seeking the euphoria feeling behind the drug(s), they just want to feel relieved from all of the abnormal things that autism and aspergers has on the individual.

Due to the fact I do have aspergers, I can confirm it did help me with social distress along with thinking more clearly and logically which you can compare to your average individual that does not suffer from aspergers or autism. That's where the addiction to the medication starts though, it's been awhile since I've taken it and the effects are long gone so the effects itself are not permanent. It looks like it provides temporary relief of such things stated above for the period of time it's in your system to feel like an equal individual.

So without a doubt, there's specific chemicals in the compound that do assist people with autism and aspergers, but on the flip side of the coin it can cause a more serious case of it from what I've read. Now I can't say this is true, I'm not a medical professional and I'm not a professional about this drug but I can say these theories are bound to answer something...I just can't land my finger on what though. I mean is it remotely possible that professionals that specialize in autism/aspergers can benefit from this knowledge? Perhaps they already know, the question is why isn't there a drug out there to help them with these symptoms after all this time.

Maybe it's too dangerous, who knows. However keep the theories rolling, it's very interesting to discuss such things if you're comfortable continuing this conversation. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

  • Group:  Members
  • Topic Count:  0
  • Content Count:  46
  • Reputation:   45
  • Joined:  01/22/2016
  • Status:  Offline
  • Last Seen:  

I'm kind of surprised your doc prescribed 30mg for someone without any tolerance. 5-10mg is more the "norm" for most situations. The side effects you mentioned would be decreased with a smaller dosage, or over time with an increased tolerance. I've noticed that for me personally with a medium tolerance, 15mg tends to be the right balance between pain relief, euphoria, positive mood, etc, and minimizing the less desirable side effects like itchiness or trouble urinating. I remember when I had zero tolerance though, and 10mg knocked me on my ass.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

  • Group:  Members
  • Topic Count:  0
  • Content Count:  288
  • Reputation:   135
  • Joined:  04/16/2016
  • Status:  Offline
  • Last Seen:  

2 hours ago, javaman said:

I'm kind of surprised your doc prescribed 30mg for someone without any tolerance. 5-10mg is more the "norm" for most situations. The side effects you mentioned would be decreased with a smaller dosage, or over time with an increased tolerance. I've noticed that for me personally with a medium tolerance, 15mg tends to be the right balance between pain relief, euphoria, positive mood, etc, and minimizing the less desirable side effects like itchiness or trouble urinating. I remember when I had zero tolerance though, and 10mg knocked me on my ass.

This was a one time thing to treat chronic pain at the time, none the less it did help. She might of gave me a higher dose to make sure it does the job seeing I'm on all different kinds of medications that could potentially lower the effect, who knows.

I should stay away from these for the most part if it's helping with my aspergers symptoms and contact my doctor to see if there's a safer alternative apposed from self-medicating myself. I should leave that to the professionals seeing this is a very specific and risky situation that I could put myself into.

30mg didn't knock me out, but I noticed I had trouble keeping my eyes open yet I wasn't sleepy at all. I felt a little drowsy but splashing some water on my face helped with that for about 20-30 minutes before I had to do it again. Unfortunately, took about 15-20 minutes to fully urinate. Have you experienced this on this drug? Just having trouble urinating? I found it strange, but it doesn't seem like it's anything major.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

  • Group:  Members
  • Topic Count:  0
  • Content Count:  46
  • Reputation:   45
  • Joined:  01/22/2016
  • Status:  Offline
  • Last Seen:  

46 minutes ago, VII said:

30mg didn't knock me out, but I noticed I had trouble keeping my eyes open yet I wasn't sleepy at all. I felt a little drowsy but splashing some water on my face helped with that for about 20-30 minutes before I had to do it again.

That's the "nod" that opiate users refer to

46 minutes ago, VII said:

Unfortunately, took about 15-20 minutes to fully urinate. Have you experienced this on this drug? Just having trouble urinating? I found it strange, but it doesn't seem like it's anything major.

Yeah, this is a pretty common side effect. Nothing to worry about, but it can be annoying. It's definitely way worse at higher doses.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

  • Group:  Members
  • Topic Count:  0
  • Content Count:  263
  • Reputation:   156
  • Joined:  12/07/2015
  • Status:  Offline
  • Last Seen:  

13 hours ago, VII said:

Have you seen any direct research about autism and opi's regarding specific tests that were conducted? It might be difficult seeing such a thing would be finding a needle in a haystack.

 

That article reviews some of the research conducted on opis & autism. This is by no means my field of expertise, so I'm relying on what the reviewers say, but her are some of the relevant studies:

"  The correlation of low pain sensitivity, high endogenous opioids levels, and autistic behaviors was first described by Panksepp (1979) and has since been associated with elevated beta-endorphin levels. The 1994 Leboyer et al. study describes findings for beta-endorphin levels in patients with infantile autism as well as for normal comparison subjects. The patients with infantile autism possessed plasma beta-endorphin levels ranging from approximately 7 to 210 pg/mL, while the control subjects possessed beta-endorphin levels ranging from approximately 0 to 20 pg/mL. Of the subjects with infantile autism, 82% possessed beta-endorphin levels exceeding those of their normal counterparts. It is of interest to note that elevated beta-endorphin levels have since been found amongst non-autistic relatives of autistic patients, suggesting a familial mode of transmission (Leboyer et al., 1999). " Beta-endorphins are your body's natural opioid agonists & function like an opioid & are pretty potent.

They also refer to some pilot studies "  Pilot work on the use of naltrexone for autism has been carried out by Panksepp and collaborators (Lensing et al., 1995). These studies show that blocking the opioid system with naltrexone at high doses of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/kg reverse the autistic behaviors and gaze aversion. To date, 0.5 mg/kg appears to be the best dose, and is equivalent to 35 mg for a 70 kg adult. Unfortunately, these small pilot studies have not been followed up with larger studies. "

&

" A comprehensive review of all articles describing and/or evaluating the efficacy of naltrexone in pediatric patients with autism uncovered a single case study consisting of ten children treated with naltrexone in which beta-endorphin levels were measured (Cazullo et al., 1999). Of the ten children, seven were considered responders as they had lower beta-endorphin levels during the three month period during which they were treated with naltrexone. This reduction in beta-endorphin levels reduced symptoms on behavioral scales (p=0.0001), improved socialization, and reduced behavioral problems. The three nonresponders had persistently elevated beta-endorphin. As a consequence of our hypothesis that opioids act as hormones, we suggest that autism treatment should focus on reducing serum beta-endorphin levels to the normal range so that the internal stimulus of opioid tone can more effectively modulate human interactions. "

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

  • Group:  Members
  • Topic Count:  0
  • Content Count:  288
  • Reputation:   135
  • Joined:  04/16/2016
  • Status:  Offline
  • Last Seen:  

On 4/24/2016 at 4:30 PM, Biteme said:

That article reviews some of the research conducted on opis & autism. This is by no means my field of expertise, so I'm relying on what the reviewers say, but her are some of the relevant studies:

"  The correlation of low pain sensitivity, high endogenous opioids levels, and autistic behaviors was first described by Panksepp (1979) and has since been associated with elevated beta-endorphin levels. The 1994 Leboyer et al. study describes findings for beta-endorphin levels in patients with infantile autism as well as for normal comparison subjects. The patients with infantile autism possessed plasma beta-endorphin levels ranging from approximately 7 to 210 pg/mL, while the control subjects possessed beta-endorphin levels ranging from approximately 0 to 20 pg/mL. Of the subjects with infantile autism, 82% possessed beta-endorphin levels exceeding those of their normal counterparts. It is of interest to note that elevated beta-endorphin levels have since been found amongst non-autistic relatives of autistic patients, suggesting a familial mode of transmission (Leboyer et al., 1999). " Beta-endorphins are your body's natural opioid agonists & function like an opioid & are pretty potent.

They also refer to some pilot studies "  Pilot work on the use of naltrexone for autism has been carried out by Panksepp and collaborators (Lensing et al., 1995). These studies show that blocking the opioid system with naltrexone at high doses of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/kg reverse the autistic behaviors and gaze aversion. To date, 0.5 mg/kg appears to be the best dose, and is equivalent to 35 mg for a 70 kg adult. Unfortunately, these small pilot studies have not been followed up with larger studies. "

&

" A comprehensive review of all articles describing and/or evaluating the efficacy of naltrexone in pediatric patients with autism uncovered a single case study consisting of ten children treated with naltrexone in which beta-endorphin levels were measured (Cazullo et al., 1999). Of the ten children, seven were considered responders as they had lower beta-endorphin levels during the three month period during which they were treated with naltrexone. This reduction in beta-endorphin levels reduced symptoms on behavioral scales (p=0.0001), improved socialization, and reduced behavioral problems. The three nonresponders had persistently elevated beta-endorphin. As a consequence of our hypothesis that opioids act as hormones, we suggest that autism treatment should focus on reducing serum beta-endorphin levels to the normal range so that the internal stimulus of opioid tone can more effectively modulate human interactions. "

 

 

 

This is very useful information to keep on hand, good find! I'll be doing more research myself-- perhaps posting some of my finds that are actually good finds apposed from what has already been discussed (which is what I find most of the time) or something that would state the obvious.

This is strange indeed, I've never heard of any medication effecting autism like this before rather it's positive or negative. It's out of this world to be honest, and I can't simply get over the fact this has already been looked into by professionals. 

I assume it's just a matter of professionals proceeding further to obtain any further answers-- this sums up most of it but there still feels like there's a gap that they're missing if you see where I'm coming from. Something's missing, I can't put my finger on what but if I figure it out I'll be sure to post it. Will be hard to do seeing most of the information stated above sums all of it up pretty much but I'll do my best.

Thank you so much for your time researching this information with me, it's been and will be very viable knowledge to have on hand one day for myself and hopefully you'll find a use for this information aswell.

Regards,

-VII

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...