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Cognitive behavioral therapy


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CBT  

5 members have voted

  1. 1. Does CBT work for you

    • Yes
      4
    • No hate it
      1


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Here are two cites I have found helpful during times of despare. They are free for the most part. If you sign up (not required) you can receive regular email and online support. They certanly are no substitute for Xanax but with an open mind it can at leaste put things in perspective.

Respectfully

McG

http://www.llttf.com

http://www.get.gg/gallery.htm

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I can't answer, because I've never had it. I do think a lot depends on the practitioner though. If you're looking at working through past issues/trauma... I'd recommend looking into EMDR, a form of psychotherapy. Make sure that the practitioner (can be a psychologist, counselor or social worker... Master's level) has completed the second practicum. This will ensure that you will not be anyone's lab rat.

They're using it with a lot of vets for PTSD, and it's becoming pretty popular because of it's high efficacy within short period of time (6 weeks should help you out).

The great part is, if you have been through some CBT you have probably identified some traumatic events (we all have them) which is the first part of therapy. Then you can shift to the main focus, which is reframing how you react to/process these events (so they don't keep biting you in the ass).

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CBT works to a point but when your really really down or anxious it's Hard to apply. I've found that mindfulness and just not allowing thoughts that are concerned with the future or past to snowball works better

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I believe CBT will work for those who are ready to engage it.  It cannot be forced upon you, say by the courts, and it's not for everyone.

 

I quit smoking using CBT.  Simple things like not sitting in the chair I usually smoked in, noting, on paper, when you smoke and try to write down why, avoiding pubs and others who smoke, and stuff like that.   I was surprised at the simplicity of the concept once you are ready to make your change.   I haven't had a smoke in 37 years.

 

I like it and think it's worth a try for anyone wishing to make any kind of behavioral change.

 

PR

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Guest kittykat

I believe CBT will work for those who are ready to engage it.  It cannot be forced upon you, say by the courts, and it's not for everyone.

 

I quit smoking using CBT.  Simple things like not sitting in the chair I usually smoked in, noting, on paper, when you smoke and try to write down why, avoiding pubs and others who smoke, and stuff like that.   I was surprised at the simplicity of the concept once you are ready to make your change.   I haven't had a smoke in 37 years.

 

I like it and think it's worth a try for anyone wishing to make any kind of behavioral change.

 

PR

How long has it been since you stopped smoking....I need to due to some  medical conditions but it is so damn hard,Plus I need to quit coffee all together for a different condition.....It is not going to be easy 4-5 lg coffee's a day down to none...I have cut back 2 1-2 1/2 decaf.....thank you for any info....

KK

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Guest kittykat

I believe CBT will work for those who are ready to engage it.  It cannot be forced upon you, say by the courts, and it's not for everyone.

 

I quit smoking using CBT.  Simple things like not sitting in the chair I usually smoked in, noting, on paper, when you smoke and try to write down why, avoiding pubs and others who smoke, and stuff like that.   I was surprised at the simplicity of the concept once you are ready to make your change.   I haven't had a smoke in 37 years.

 

I like it and think it's worth a try for anyone wishing to make any kind of behavioral change.

 

PR

Good for you !  That is great...

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I have used cbt for panic. I cannot take benzos so this has been a blessing. The type of cbt i use is simple. I LOVE to cook (not a chef like Cheftell and Zonked however) so whenever i feel panic coming on i picture myself making lasagna. Every little detail from picking the tomatoes, making the pasta from scratch, and right down to the final garnish of the fresh basil. I mean EVERY detail. Sometimes i have to force myself and repeat certain steps of the lasagna making, but somehow, every time it works. If i make it to garnish without relief, i just start over again. This tool has proven very valuable for me. Tall big men with deep voices will put me in panic mode every time, well maybe not every time, but 90% of the time, and being in a male dominated profession, i run into these types of men often. Cbt has been a miracle and i am so glad that i have learned it.

I would be very interested in hearing the details of the type of cbt people use successfully. Since the panic will be with me the rest of my life, i would love to maybe learn something!

Thanks and much love......

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Hi @KittyKat,

 

I just want to say first that I enjoy your posts.

 

Anyway, first the cigs.   I quit 30 years ago (I think I said 37 before but I calculated it again and its more like 30 years.)   My company adopted a no-smoking policy in the office I worked in and they offered a free class sponsored by the American Cancer Society.  I figured, sure, why not, I get out of the office a coupla hours a week and maybe I'll learn something.  I went and sat in a circle with a group and did what they told me to do.   I was amazed at how easy it was to quit if I just followed their instructions - which amounted to a CBT tactic.   Within a couple of weeks (I think, I don't remember how long) I threw it all in the garbage and never looked back.   Yeah, I still smoke in my dreams and I like the smell of a freshly lit cigarette but i won't smoke today.  Ask me tomorrow and I'll try to tell you the same.

 

Next, coffee.   Y'know my wife has acid reflux due to pressure somewhere in her abdomen.  I don't know enough about the cause, but she has a list of things she has to do and can't have.  One is caffeine.  You said in your post that you have to quit coffee.  I'm assuming you mean that you have to quit caffeine, not necessarily coffee beans.  Based on that let me tell you what we figured out; maybe it'll help:  First, in some cases, company's "decaf" has close to as much caffeine as some others' regular - but keep in mind this goes back a few years and folks are more aware of this stuff now.   So we had to figure out which had what and how much.  We found an authoritative list somewhere on the 'net (sorry, I don't have a link) but it listed sample relative caffeine content by vendor.  What I recall from memory were two things:  Sanka has the least, and Starbucks decaf has as much caffeine as some regulars.  We thought about what we discovered and this is what we decided:   We got a Keurig so everyone in the family can have what they want (I mean, I'm not gettin' outta bed to walk the dog until I've had a 20 oz Starbucks French Roast (boom!) ).  I also found out by searching on Amazon that there are lots of "bold" coffees and flavored (Hazelnut, etc) decaffeinated coffee that taste the same (to me anyway) as the regulars.  So, this is the list my wife gets, and she can drink one regular a day before 3PM, the rest decaf, even at night:

 

-  Green Mountain Hazelnut Kcups decaf

-  Green Mountain Vanilla Caramel kcups decaf

-  Starbucks Veranda Blonde light regular (for her regular)

-  Either Paul Newman's or Donut House Decaf Kcup

 

And she agrees that there isn't really a difference in taste.

 

I hope some of this helps; I know how tough it can be to give up the things we enjoy.  I don't know how I would give up two things.

 

So please let us all know what you decide to do!

 

Regards,

 

PR

 

and.... A shout out to you @Catinthehat!  How's it goin?

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Guest kittykat

Hi @KittyKat,

 

I just want to say first that I enjoy your posts.

 

Anyway, first the cigs.   I quit 30 years ago (I think I said 37 before but I calculated it again and its more like 30 years.)   My company adopted a no-smoking policy in the office I worked in and they offered a free class sponsored by the American Cancer Society.  I figured, sure, why not, I get out of the office a coupla hours a week and maybe I'll learn something.  I went and sat in a circle with a group and did what they told me to do.   I was amazed at how easy it was to quit if I just followed their instructions - which amounted to a CBT tactic.   Within a couple of weeks (I think, I don't remember how long) I threw it all in the garbage and never looked back.   Yeah, I still smoke in my dreams and I like the smell of a freshly lit cigarette but i won't smoke today.  Ask me tomorrow and I'll try to tell you the same.

 

Next, coffee.   Y'know my wife has acid reflux due to pressure somewhere in her abdomen.  I don't know enough about the cause, but she has a list of things she has to do and can't have.  One is caffeine.  You said in your post that you have to quit coffee.  I'm assuming you mean that you have to quit caffeine, not necessarily coffee beans.  Based on that let me tell you what we figured out; maybe it'll help:  First, in some cases, company's "decaf" has close to as much caffeine as some others' regular - but keep in mind this goes back a few years and folks are more aware of this stuff now.   So we had to figure out which had what and how much.  We found an authoritative list somewhere on the 'net (sorry, I don't have a link) but it listed sample relative caffeine content by vendor.  What I recall from memory were two things:  Sanka has the least, and Starbucks decaf has as much caffeine as some regulars.  We thought about what we discovered and this is what we decided:   We got a Keurig so everyone in the family can have what they want (I mean, I'm not gettin' outta bed to walk the dog until I've had a 20 oz Starbucks French Roast (boom!) ).  I also found out by searching on Amazon that there are lots of "bold" coffees and flavored (Hazelnut, etc) decaffeinated coffee that taste the same (to me anyway) as the regulars.  So, this is the list my wife gets, and she can drink one regular a day before 3PM, the rest decaf, even at night:

 

-  Green Mountain Hazelnut Kcups decaf

-  Green Mountain Vanilla Caramel kcups decaf

-  Starbucks Veranda Blonde light regular (for her regular)

-  Either Paul Newman's or Donut House Decaf Kcup

 

And she agrees that there isn't really a difference in taste.

 

I hope some of this helps; I know how tough it can be to give up the things we enjoy.  I don't know how I would give up two things.

 

So please let us all know what you decide to do!

 

Regards,

 

PR

 

and.... A shout out to you @Catinthehat!  How's it goin?

Thank you so much for the feedback......I do have a kerig  It is awesome .......Gotta give it a try..Thanks bunches...KK

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How long has it been since you stopped smoking....I need to due to some  medical conditions but it is so damn hard,Plus I need to quit coffee all together for a different condition.....It is not going to be easy 4-5 lg coffee's a day down to none...I have cut back 2 1-2 1/2 decaf.....thank you for any info....

KK

Hey KK,

Hope you are well on this lovely afternoon. For quitting smoking, the "e cigarette" has been absolutely amazing for me. You have to be sure to get a good one, i use the "neverlightagain" and it is about thirty bucks to get started. You can choose your cartridge flavor..from regular tobacco/menthol to fruits and such. You may think it sounds nasty but the flavors are quite good. If you are a menthol smoker, the "ice" flavor is the bees knees. The "filter" cartridge part is where the flavor is and the rest of the e cigarette is the battery that helps to create the vapor. You can even blow smoke rings. You can charge them in an electrical outlet and in a usb port. It is a little heavier than a cigarette but i find it to be a vey good likeness. You can even get the cartridges with nicotine in them. You can refill the cartridges but it lessens the experience for me. I would recommend fresh cartridges every day, especially when first quitting. It is still less expensive than cigarettes. Plus, the vapor dissipates very quickly once you exhale, so there is no residual smoke or odor. You can pretty much smoke everywhere! I quit july 2, 2012. I decided to treat myself to a cigarette on New years Eve last year and did not return to smoking regularly. I feel SO SO much better. I have pasted a link to the site below. Good luck and much love KK.

https://www.neverlightagain.com/#

Your friend (lol!)

Catinthehat

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Hi @KittyKat,

 

I just want to say first that I enjoy your posts.

 

Anyway, first the cigs.   I quit 30 years ago (I think I said 37 before but I calculated it again and its more like 30 years.)   My company adopted a no-smoking policy in the office I worked in and they offered a free class sponsored by the American Cancer Society.  I figured, sure, why not, I get out of the office a coupla hours a week and maybe I'll learn something.  I went and sat in a circle with a group and did what they told me to do.   I was amazed at how easy it was to quit if I just followed their instructions - which amounted to a CBT tactic.   Within a couple of weeks (I think, I don't remember how long) I threw it all in the garbage and never looked back.   Yeah, I still smoke in my dreams and I like the smell of a freshly lit cigarette but i won't smoke today.  Ask me tomorrow and I'll try to tell you the same.

 

Next, coffee.   Y'know my wife has acid reflux due to pressure somewhere in her abdomen.  I don't know enough about the cause, but she has a list of things she has to do and can't have.  One is caffeine.  You said in your post that you have to quit coffee.  I'm assuming you mean that you have to quit caffeine, not necessarily coffee beans.  Based on that let me tell you what we figured out; maybe it'll help:  First, in some cases, company's "decaf" has close to as much caffeine as some others' regular - but keep in mind this goes back a few years and folks are more aware of this stuff now.   So we had to figure out which had what and how much.  We found an authoritative list somewhere on the 'net (sorry, I don't have a link) but it listed sample relative caffeine content by vendor.  What I recall from memory were two things:  Sanka has the least, and Starbucks decaf has as much caffeine as some regulars.  We thought about what we discovered and this is what we decided:   We got a Keurig so everyone in the family can have what they want (I mean, I'm not gettin' outta bed to walk the dog until I've had a 20 oz Starbucks French Roast (boom!) ).  I also found out by searching on Amazon that there are lots of "bold" coffees and flavored (Hazelnut, etc) decaffeinated coffee that taste the same (to me anyway) as the regulars.  So, this is the list my wife gets, and she can drink one regular a day before 3PM, the rest decaf, even at night:

 

-  Green Mountain Hazelnut Kcups decaf

-  Green Mountain Vanilla Caramel kcups decaf

-  Starbucks Veranda Blonde light regular (for her regular)

-  Either Paul Newman's or Donut House Decaf Kcup

 

And she agrees that there isn't really a difference in taste.

 

I hope some of this helps; I know how tough it can be to give up the things we enjoy.  I don't know how I would give up two things.

 

So please let us all know what you decide to do!

 

Regards,

 

PR

 

and.... A shout out to you @Catinthehat!  How's it goin?

Shout out to packrat! I am very well, just watching football and making homemade pizza! How goes it with you.

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i had generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder when I tried CBT. I will say that it gave me some good tools for panic attacks. I still get them, but I don't fear them so much. CBT isn't so good for my generalized anxiety. Any time I've tried to bring up the past for context, I've always felt ushered back into "what can we do right now". I find the whole approach very goal-oriented, which isn't for me, and exacerbates my anxiety. I just don't believe changing my behavior tackles the roots of my problems.

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The jury is still out for me regarding CBT?... Although I found it helpful during (probably because of the regularity of talking about your shit with someone), afterwards, not so much?...

In fact, I almost had withdrawal after the sessions as they became an integral part of my life at the time?... Plus my therapist was hot!.. Which probably didn't help, as I definitely wasn't as honest as I should have been?... I also think this is why afterwards I had withdrawal? : )...

We only seemed to skirt around the reasons I thought like I did and I didn't really learn any radically new coping mechanisms... I was already aware of most of the things we covered, so it didn't really enlighten me much further...

In fact, if anything, it just bolstered the fact I knew I had something wrong with me mentally and the outlook was poor regarding ever changing that?.. Apart from the pills & potions I as already taking : (...

So, my vote is, although it may be helpful for somebody who isn't aware they are acting any differently, or are in complete denial, it isn't very helpful for somebody like me...

~P~

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In my experience, CBT and SSRIs are the least effective things for me, and their the first line treatments, because I guess the more effective something is the more of a double edged sword it can be. I had for anxiety maybe...8 years ago...didn't help, I wasn't open enough. I had a bit of a crisis about 3 years ago, and was in a pretty bad place. Back then it wasn't CBT I had, it was just people talking with me, sitting in cafes with me, walking through the park with me. That helped because I was neck deep in suicidal shit and I just needed to open up about how shit I felt. That went on for about 5 weeks, after which they put me on Citalopram - cheers tw*tbags! But it did help me, but it wasn't aimed at getting to the root of my problems and sorting them out, it was basically to keep me out of hospital under supervision and to give me hope to live. For me, that's when talking helps the most.

 

Over the next 3 years I learnt from that to open up more to my friends and family to where I am now, in an open, honest and loving relationship and I've got plans to finally study what I want to, something I hid from for so many years. But I put a lot of this down to, one, the crises, and secondly, the support and motivation I got from the support that followed.

 

That's not CBT, I got distracted....but CBT, it can work if you're motivated. It's like studying. You have to be motivated, a lot of it is like theory, you have to motivate yourself. One of the first symptoms of depression, lack of motivation. That's why they combine them with the apparently motivating SSRIs. Yeah, they motivate you. What do you get when you motivate a depressed person? Not good. I was a quivering, hopeless suicidal wreck and they put me on fluoxetine and just a long waiting list for therapy. 6 weeks later, just as the useless SSRIs started wreaking their havoc, bam. Seriously, dangerous, terrible medications, SSRIs are.

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In my experience, CBT and SSRIs are the least effective things for me, and their the first line treatments, because I guess the more effective something is the more of a double edged sword it can be. I had for anxiety maybe...8 years ago...didn't help, I wasn't open enough. I had a bit of a crisis about 3 years ago, and was in a pretty bad place. Back then it wasn't CBT I had, it was just people talking with me, sitting in cafes with me, walking through the park with me. That helped because I was neck deep in suicidal shit and I just needed to open up about how shit I felt. That went on for about 5 weeks, after which they put me on Citalopram - cheers tw*tbags! But it did help me, but it wasn't aimed at getting to the root of my problems and sorting them out, it was basically to keep me out of hospital under supervision and to give me hope to live. For me, that's when talking helps the most.

 

Over the next 3 years I learnt from that to open up more to my friends and family to where I am now, in an open, honest and loving relationship and I've got plans to finally study what I want to, something I hid from for so many years. But I put a lot of this down to, one, the crises, and secondly, the support and motivation I got from the support that followed.

 

That's not CBT, I got distracted....but CBT, it can work if you're motivated. It's like studying. You have to be motivated, a lot of it is like theory, you have to motivate yourself. One of the first symptoms of depression, lack of motivation. That's why they combine them with the apparently motivating SSRIs. Yeah, they motivate you. What do you get when you motivate a depressed person? Not good. I was a quivering, hopeless suicidal wreck and they put me on fluoxetine and just a long waiting list for therapy. 6 weeks later, just as the useless SSRIs started wreaking their havoc, bam. Seriously, dangerous, terrible medications, SSRIs are.

Right with ya' on the SSRI's Smoka!

Sorry to hear you had such a rough time of it 3 years ago?!.. Glad you seem to be doing better now my friend ; )

~P~

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