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high sugar foods


EasyMoneySnip3r
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Sugar has become a super-villain of sorts. We see its evil machinations in the form of Tony the Tigerleering down at children and in rats getting addicted to Oreos like they were cocaine. If it hasn’t already, the sweet stuff will turn us all into zombies. Even the substitutes it has spawned can cause weight gain, brain tumors, bladder cancer, and many other health problems.

Still, 71.4 percent of American adults allot more room for processed sugar in their caloric intake than the recommended 10 percent—and the World Health Organization cut the recommendation to 5 percent last month.

Why are we still eating so much of the pernicious substance?

Scientific evidence of its addictive quality for humans is still lacking, but what we know for sure is that thanks to the food industry, sugar has been sneaking up on consumers where they might least expect it.

The good news is that many are fighting back. A new documentary produced and narrated by Katie Couric, for instance, seeks to expose the dirt on sugar and junk food and how they drive America’s obesity epidemic. Scientists in the Netherlands have pushed the conversation for legislative solutions; they recently proved that more taxes on sodas reduce sugar consumption without inclining customers to buy other unhealthy foods.

So here’s our bit of contribution to the battle: We’ve listed 12 foods that exceed the 10 grams of sugar in a classic Krispy Kreme glazed doughnut. They differ in nutritional contents, of course (keep in mind that a glazed doughnut also has 11 grams of fat). But if you’re cutting back, it’s good to know how these stack up against the all-American snack. D6C92B54-8275-42AF-9F2A-FC6B89A0A7F8.jpeg.911d42372038518d258026e13a9408c9.jpeg

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