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Another Vote For Simplicity


HYPNOTIC.

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I’m fortunate to live in an area where I have access to several similar hills. They range from moderately difficult to downright brutal. Some are short and steep, while others continue upward for well over a mile. I’ve taken some of the best fighters in the world running on these local hills and everyone shares in the ass kickery. It doesn’t matter what kind of shape you are in, the hill always wins. And if a hill workout isn’t challenging enough, you can always run faster. Running faster is the only modification you’ll ever need. It is only a matter of time before the hill takes over.

What is the point?

Yes, hill sprints are tough. We don’t need Captain Obvious to figure this out. So, why am I bothering to tell you about hill sprints?

The point to this entry is that simple workouts are often superior. A hill workout does not require any equipment, yet can be as brutal as any. There is a mountain in my area that we’ve run for many years. I ran it when I was fighting, and I’ve taken other fighters there as a trainer. It’s free to run. Anyone can drive over and park at the bottom. It’s possibly the best workout you could perform, yet I can’t remember ever seeing anyone else running the hill. Sure, we’ll see people hiking in the woods or walking a dog, but I’ve never seen anyone else actually running the mountain.

The hill serves as a tremendous free resource that is readily available. You don’t need to worry about changing the settings on a machine or dropping a piece of iron on your head. You don’t need instruction from an Olympic track coach to figure out how to get from point A to point B. Running isn’t complicated. We’ve all been doing it since we were toddlers.. Repeat the process as many times as you’d like (or are able to).

People either don’t know about hill sprints, or perhaps know too much about them and don’t want any part.

Another theory is that people seem to discredit simplicity. They falsely assume that complexity trumps simplicity, when often the opposite is true. Perhaps it is a good time for me to share a favorite quote that I’ve referenced here before (and will likely reference again). In the words of E.F. Schumacher:

“Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius—and a lot of courage—to move in the opposite direction.â€

Keep It Simple

It is almost as if we’ve been programmed against simplicity. Not long ago, I suggested hill sprints to a trainer who had emailed me in search of outdoor conditioning drills. He responded by saying that hills are fairly basic on their own, so would rather spice things up. My first thought was that he’s probably never run hill sprints. I have my own athletes to worry about however, and wasn’t looking for an argument. I wished him the best of luck and thought that was the end of it…

A few days passed and he emailed me again. This time he wanted feedback on his ideas for spicing things up. He proposed throwing a medicine ball uphill. He would then have the group lunge walk uphill until they had reached the ball. They would then take the ball and do 5 pushups with hands on top of the ball, and then lunge walk with it in hand for 4 more steps. They would then continue with another throw.

All I could imagine was a group of people throwing medicine balls, and then tripping over each other trying to catch the balls that were rolling back towards the bottom of the hill. There is no way a group could perform this workout without mass chaos and confusion. Even if the workout was done solo, I still don’t see the real benefit to it. What does it accomplish? Why not simply sprint to the top of the hill? And if you want variety, perform an exercise at the top. For example, sprint uphill and then drop for a quick set of pushups before heading back down for another sprint. Hill sprints with pushups at the top are brutal. I used to perform this exact routine at a hill in Manchester (CT). I’d run 10 sprints with 20 pushups at the top of each sprint. I didn’t need to lug any equipment with me and I always left with a thorough ass kicking.

More Than Hills

Hill sprints are clearly effective, but I realize that hills are not always available. Hill sprints are also not the panacea to training. I didn’t write this entry hoping that you’d abandon everything that you do in place of a few hill sprints, but rather as a simple reminder that complex workouts are rarely necessary. The basics work very well if you put forth a true effort. The simple lesson behind this entry can be applied to almost any style of training, not just conditioning.

I have a friend who fought many years ago who continues to stay active with what many would consider a basic routine. Ironically, he remains in much better shape than most. He lifts weights one day, runs hill sprints with some calisthencis the next, and then hits the heavy bag on the third day. It’s a very simple 3 day plan that he repeats twice a week, always resting on Sunday. He has been doing this for as long as I can remember. He mixes things up by running different spots and changing the specific contents of certain workouts, but the general layout remains in tact. Two days of lifting, two days of running and calisthenics, and two days of heavy bag work. That’s it. He’s strong, runs in local 5k’s, and can still hold is own with the gloves. Not a bad mix for a man in his 40’s.

Many could learn and benefit from his so-called basic example.

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Love it!

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Ephedrine and Training

I have received several inquiries regarding the use of ephedrine-based supplements to enhance the intensity and weight loss effects of a boxing routine. Many supplements combine ephedrine with caffeine as a means to increase energy. Common examples include Ripped Fuel, Ripped Force, and Xenadrine RFA-1. Recently, several ephedrine products have come under harsh criticism by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Ephedrine is a central nervous system stimulant and decongestant that is effective for relieving bronchial asthma. It is derived from plants of the genus Ephedra. It comes from the Chinese herb Ma Huang. Ephedrine has been used for centuries as both a stimulant and bronchodilator. Recently, ephedrine has been marketed to athletes and those looking to lose weight, based on its ability to trigger energy bursts while causing a reduced appetite.

Unfortunately, since 1993 the FDA states that at least 17 people have died and 800 made ill by dietary supplements containing ephedrine. The FDA recommends a maximum daily ephedrine dose of 24 milligrams. Each supplement should contain no more than 8 milligrams of ephedrine per serving and should not be taken continuously for over a 1-week period. The side effects of ephedrine include elevated blood pressure, irregular heartbeat, stroke, dizziness, restlessness, irritability, and headache. Combinations of ephedrine and caffeine cause side effects substantially worse than those from either compound alone. Most energy enhancement products that contain ephedrine also contain caffeine.

Due to the widespread criticism of ephedrine-based supplements, many product manufacturers have created similar products that do not contain ephedrine. An example is the new ephedrine-free Xenadrine EFX. These products claim to provide increased energy without the dangers of ephedrine. These replacement products often increase caffeine to make up for the lack of ephedrine.

Do these products provide any benefits to the aspiring boxer? After all, boxing is perhaps the most physically demanding sport. Conditioning often means the difference between winning and losing. In addition, a boxer must stay within a specific weight range when competing. Are these products beneficial to fighters? I will emphatically answer both of these questions with a very stern NO. These products are NOT beneficial to competitive boxers.

It is worth repeating that boxing is perhaps the most physically demanding sport of all. Physical conditioning almost always plays a factor in the outcome of a bout. When two equally skilled fighters compete, the deciding factor is often conditioning. Unfortunately, there are no magic pills to create a champion. Boxing is a very difficult sport. Those not willing to train hard and make the appropriate sacrifices are quickly weeded out.

There are no shortcuts in this sport. Boxing has very little to do with luck and a whole lot to do with hard work. By relying on a substance to provide energy, you become dependent both physically and mentally. You begin to think that without the product you cannot succeed. This mindset is detrimental to young boxers. Boxing is a mental sport where you must enter the ring with confidence. You must learn to rely and depend on your skills and training, not on a pill or energy drink.

Consider past greats like Rocky Marciano and Muhammad Ali who came up in an era before these products were available. These extraordinary athletes were able to perform at levels previously unknown without the use of "energy" supplements. These great boxers are real life examples that hard work is all that is required to achieve optimum physical and mental condition.

Furthermore, both the International Olympic Committee and National Collegiate Athletic Association ban the use of ephedrine-based products. The Professional Boxing Control Regulations of 1996 also lists ephedrine as a banned substance. For this reason, you will not be able to compete with these products at Olympic or professional competitions. Get used to relying on your hard work. The dependencies that you will develop for energy supplements will become difficult to overcome.

I can tell you from experience that these products do not provide any worthwhile advantages. As a youngster, I tried products such as Ripped Fuel without results. Boxing is performed at an anaerobic pace where combinations are fired in rapid succession. These products cause your heart to beat too fast.

I strongly recommend avoiding these products when boxing. There is no substitute for hard work and proper nutrition. Eat smart and train hard and you will be ready to perform.

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Some interesting stuff there about Ephedrine, although I don't agree it's that bad in small amounts. Certainly no worse than much of the stuff being sold in the Mexican section or certain pain pills.

However, I do take issue with direct plagiarism as being the former university graduate as you've said you once were.

You you should know better than to "cut and paste" material directly off the internet and pass it off as being yours. The least you could do is quote the source from where you stole it from.

http://www.rossboxin...gym/thegym7.htm

I have received several inquiries regarding the use of ephedrine-based supplements to enhance the intensity and weight loss effects of a boxing routine. Many supplements combine ephedrine with caffeine as a means to increase energy. Common examples include Ripped Fuel, Ripped Force, and Xenadrine RFA-1. Recently, several ephedrine products have come under harsh criticism by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Ephedrine is a central nervous system stimulant and decongestant that is effective for relieving bronchial asthma. It is derived from plants of the genus Ephedra. It comes from the Chinese herb Ma Huang. Ephedrine has been used for centuries as both a stimulant and bronchodilator. Recently, ephedrine has been marketed to athletes and those looking to lose weight, based on its ability to trigger energy bursts while causing a reduced appetite.

Unfortunately, since 1993 the FDA states that at least 17 people have died and 800 made ill by dietary supplements containing ephedrine. The FDA recommends a maximum daily ephedrine dose of 24 milligrams. Each supplement should contain no more than 8 milligrams of ephedrine per serving and should not be taken continuously for over a 1-week period. The side effects of ephedrine include elevated blood pressure, irregular heartbeat, stroke, dizziness, restlessness, irritability, and headache. Combinations of ephedrine and caffeine cause side effects substantially worse than those from either compound alone. Most energy enhancement products that contain ephedrine also contain caffeine.

Due to the widespread criticism of ephedrine-based supplements, many product manufacturers have created similar products that do not contain ephedrine. An example is the new ephedrine-free Xenadrine EFX. These products claim to provide increased energy without the dangers of ephedrine. These replacement products often increase caffeine to make up for the lack of ephedrine.

Do these products provide any benefits to the aspiring boxer? After all, boxing is perhaps the most physically demanding sport. Conditioning often means the difference between winning and losing. In addition, a boxer must stay within a specific weight range when competing. Are these products beneficial to fighters? I will emphatically answer both of these questions with a very stern NO. These products are NOT beneficial to competitive boxers.

It is worth repeating that boxing is perhaps the most physically demanding sport of all. Physical conditioning almost always plays a factor in the outcome of a bout. When two equally skilled fighters compete, the deciding factor is often conditioning. Unfortunately, there are no magic pills to create a champion. Boxing is a very difficult sport. Those not willing to train hard and make the appropriate sacrifices are quickly weeded out.

There are no shortcuts in this sport. Boxing has very little to do with luck and a whole lot to do with hard work. By relying on a substance to provide energy, you become dependent both physically and mentally. You begin to think that without the product you cannot succeed. This mindset is detrimental to young boxers. Boxing is a mental sport where you must enter the ring with confidence. You must learn to rely and depend on your skills and training, not on a pill or energy drink.

Consider past greats like Rocky Marciano and Muhammad Ali who came up in an era before these products were available. These extraordinary athletes were able to perform at levels previously unknown without the use of "energy" supplements. These great boxers are real life examples that hard work is all that is required to achieve optimum physical and mental condition.

Furthermore, both the International Olympic Committee and National Collegiate Athletic Association ban the use of ephedrine-based products. The Professional Boxing Control Regulations of 1996 also lists ephedrine as a banned substance. For this reason, you will not be able to compete with these products at Olympic or professional competitions. Get used to relying on your hard work. The dependencies that you will develop for energy supplements will become difficult to overcome.

I can tell you from experience that these products do not provide any worthwhile advantages. As a youngster, I tried products such as Ripped Fuel without results. Boxing is performed at an anaerobic pace where combinations are fired in rapid succession. These products cause your heart to beat too fast.

I strongly recommend avoiding these products when boxing. There is no substitute for hard work and proper nutrition. Eat smart and train hard and you will be ready to perform.

About the Author - Ross Enamait is an innovative athlete and trainer, whose training style is among the most intense that you will find. Ross is committed to excellence and advancements in high performance conditioning and functional strength development. He has a sincere interest in helping today's athlete in their quest for greatness.

Ross has authored several comprehensive training manuals, designed for athletes participating in combat sports such as boxing, wrestling, and MMA.

DITCH

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Good God!

Not this one too.... with reference to the first post on this thread.

http://rosstraining....for-simplicity/

Tisk tisk....what a 'trooper' you've turned out to be.

Get some rest pal, before you blow a socket.

DITCH

Good point! The last two articles where not written by me but I thought they were interesting never the less.

Reference: http://www.rosstrain...upplements.html

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intressing artiicle i read the are some intressing things in there

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Reminds me of basic, we would do hill sprints until we were puking! But on my final APFT I ended up running 12min 42 sec 2 mile run. I believe those hill sprints greatly helped. Right now I just maintain about a 14 min 2 mile, because I am on a heavy 2 hr a day lifting schedule

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I agree

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